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Главная страница Новости науки Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews
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ScienceDirect Publication: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews
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ScienceDirect Publication: Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews
  • Modifications on reduced titanium dioxide photocatalysts: A review
    Publication date: September 2017
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 32

    Author(s): Wenzhang Fang, Mingyang Xing, Jinlong Zhang

    A large variety of reduced titanium dioxide (TiO2-x) materials have been reported recently. Reduced TiO2, usually resulting from the removal of oxygen atoms or hydrogen incorporation, is proved to be efficient for achieving highly photocatalytic performance including photodegradation of organic compounds, hydrogen generation from water splitting, CO2 reduction for CH4 evolution, solar cells, etc. To further improve the properties and activities of TiO2-x, a combination of the Ti3+ self-doping and other traditional modifications like nonmetals doping has been proposed in the past decades. This paper provides a general and critical review on the further modifications on reduced TiO2 samples, including non-metal elements (N, B, S, F and I) doping, noble-metal (Au, Pt, Pd and Ag) and iron-group metal (Fe, Co and Ni) grafting, metal oxide compositing, carbon (nanotubes and graphene) and carbon-based-material compositing, special facets exposure (mainly dual {001}-{101} and {111}-{110} facets) of TiO2-x and ordered structure controlling of TiO2-x. These modifications enhance the physical and/or chemical properties of the reduced TiO2, or create new features for the modified TiO2-x samples, which finally leads to the enhancement of photocatalytic performance. Key examples such as N-doping, Au grafting and graphene-based compositing are discussed carefully, and the mechanisms for solar light enhancement, electron transfer and charge separation are also investigated. Finally, some challenging issues on TiO2-x catalysts are also proposed to encourage new approaches for preparation of TiO2-x catalysts with efficiently photocatalytic performance.

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  • Medically translatable quantum dots for biosensing and imaging
    Publication date: March 2017
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 30

    Author(s): Youngrong Park, Sanghwa Jeong, Sungjee Kim

    Photoluminescent quantum dots (QDs) promise many biomedical applications as a new class of optical probes showing unique optical properties such as high brightness, stability, and multiplexing ability. In this review, we focus on recent research interest of medically-translatable QDs for in vitro biomedical sensing and in vivo imaging. QD-based biomedical sensing shows higher selectivity and sensitivity over conventional methods for immunohistochemistry, immunoassay, and enzymatic assays. In addition, QD-based biosensors afford simple detections of multiple biomarkers. QD probes in the second near-infrared region (1000λ1700nm) show the great potential for in vivo fluorescence imaging because of the suppressed light scattering and the capability for deep tissue penetration. The second near-infrared emitting QDs covered in this review include Ag2S, Ag2Se, Ag2Te, PbS, PbSe, InAs, Cd3P2, Cd6P7, and Cd3As2 QDs. In vivo imaging properties of these QDs are highlighted with special reference to vasculature imaging and tumor localization.

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  • Reaction dynamics of excited radical ions revealed by femtosecond laser flash photolysis
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 35

    Author(s): Mamoru Fujitsuka, Tetsuro Majima

    Herein, we review studies on the dynamics of excited radical ions. The enhanced reactivities of excited radical ions are recognized by many researchers based on product analysis studies conducted around 1980. For cases involving fluorescent excited radical ions, lifetime measurements provide information on excited states, and they sometimes lead to confusion owing to emissive byproducts resulting from their higher reactivities. Nanosecond laser flash photolysis studies provide evidence of the reactions of excited radical ions, and analyses of their kinetics reveal properties such as their excited-state lifetimes despite an indirect manner. Recent femtosecond laser flash photolysis studies provide detailed pictures of excited radical ions, though such studies are few. Furthermore, studies on dyad or triad systems, including excited radical ions, show electron transfer dynamics and disclose characteristics of excited radical ions that differ from those in neutral states. Larger electronic coupling and smaller dumping factor are reported as important characteristics of electron transfer systems of excited radical ions. These systematic studies on excited radical ions demonstrate their suitability for applications.

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  • Photo- and redoxfunctional cyclophanes, macrocycles, and catenanes based on aromatic bisimides
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 31

    Author(s): Peter Spenst, Frank Würthner

    Aromatic bis(dicarboximides), abbreviated as bisimides or diimides, are interesting building blocks for the construction of electro- and photofunctional architectures. The possibility of reversible reduction of aromatic molecules equipped with imide units at modest redox potentials between about −1.3 and −1.0V vs. the ferrocenium/ferrocene redox couple could be exploited by a broad variety of electroactive cyclophanes, macrocycles and catenane scaffolds to direct molecular motions by charging the systems with electrons. Whilst most of the work in this field has been accomplished for the smaller pyromellitic (PyBI) and naphthalene bisimides (NBI), the larger perylene bisimides (PBI) offered an entry into the field of photofunctional systems. Here cyclophanes with closely stacked PBI units provided insight into exciton coupling in homo and hetero dye dimers or ultrafast loss of coherence of the initially populated exciton states to give excimers or symmetry-broken charge separated states. In contrast, for PBI cyclophanes with larger cavities guest encapsulation could efficiently modulate the photophysical properties to give highly fluorescent host–guest complexes upon incorporation of electron-poor aromatic guest molecules or fully quenched systems upon incorporation of electron-rich molecules. For larger PBI macrocycles energy transfer processes could be investigated as well as the solvent-templated folding into double string ropes with high sensitivity (absorption, fluorescence) for the specific aromatic solvents. Finally, with a metallosupramolecular approach larger macrocycles (e.g. squares and hexagons) and cages (e.g. tetrahedrons) became accessible which could be exploited to study a variety of electro- and photophysical processes.







  • Corrigendum to “Reaction dynamics of excited radical ions revealed by femtosecond laser flash photolysis” [J. Photochem. Photobiol. C: Photochem. Rev. 35 (2018) 25–37]
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 35

    Author(s): Mamoru Fujitsuka, Tetsuro Majima









  • Interfacial charge transfer in semiconductor-molecular photocatalyst systems for proton reduction
    Publication date: December 2017
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 33

    Author(s): Xiuli Wang, Can Li

    Solar fuels have proven to be one of the important promising approaches to provide clean energy of H2. It is an effective strategy for H2 production to construct photocatalytic systems using semiconductor as a sensitizer and molecular catalyst as the H2 evolution catalyst. In the semiconductor-molecular photocatalyst systems (SMP systems) for proton reduction, the interfacial charge transfer, including electron and hole transfer, is the determining factor for the photocatalytic process from kinetic aspects. The knowledge of the interfacial charge transfer is of utmost importance for understanding the photocatalytic systems. This review focuses on the interfacial charge transfer in SMP systems for proton reduction, with a special emphasis on the advances in the studies on the kinetic aspects of interfacial charge transfer.







  • Recent development on MoS2-based photocatalysis: A review
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 35

    Author(s): Zizhen Li, Xiangchao Meng, Zisheng Zhang

    MoS2-based photocatalysts attract wide attention as they possess a suitable band gap for visible-light harvesting, making it a promising earth-abundant photocatalyst for hydrogen production, environmental remediation, and photosynthesis. However, the rapid recombination of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, limited quantity of active edge sites, and difficult photocatalyst separation and recycling hinder the practical application of this material. In this review, recent development of MoS2-based photocatalysts in various photocatalytic applications is summarized. In addition, possible approaches to enhance photocatalytic activity and separate photocatalysts from reaction media are discussed to provide a future direction in highly efficient photocatalyst design.

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  • IFC(EDITORIAL BOARD)
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 31











  • Conjugated macrocyclic materials with photoactivated optical absorption for the control of energy transmission delivered by pulsed radiations
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 35

    Author(s): Mário J.F. Calvete, Danilo Dini

    The control of the transmission of the energy transported by optical waves is of extreme importance for the realization of those advanced technologies which require high speed of operation and fast switching. Such a task can be approached through the design and preparation of materials that possess modulable optical properties. In the present review the aspect of material science behind the realization of the effect of optical limiting, OL (or optical power limiting, OPL), will be considered focusing on those materials based on conjugated metallo-macrocycles like porphyrins, phthalocyanines and derivatives. The choice of these molecular materials for OL purposes is motivated by the fact that the optical properties of such annulated systems can be finely modulated in a controlled fashion by changing the chemical structure of the complex. These changes involve the variation of the central metal, the extent of electronic conjugation of the ring, the nature and the number of peripheral ligands, and the eventual introduction of axial ligands coordinated by a central metals with a valence higher than +2. An attempt will be made to establish relationships between the structure of the macrocyclic complex and the relative OL properties taking into account the most recent developments in the field. During this analysis we will also discuss the aspect of optically passivity, i.e. the characteristic of the OL materials of undergoing fast changes of optical properties according to an internal mechanism of self-activation.

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  • Thermometers for monitoring cellular temperature
    Publication date: March 2017
    Source:Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology C: Photochemistry Reviews, Volume 30

    Author(s): Masahiro Nakano, Takeharu Nagai

    Temperature is a critical parameter that influences various biological events and reactions in homeotherms (including mammals), poikilotherms, and plants. However, the spatiotemporal patterns of temperature at the single-cell level remain largely unknown. Various kinds of thermometers have been developed for monitoring temperature at the single-cell level. We introduce some cellular thermometers based on Europium (III) thenoyltrifluoroacetonate trihydrate, gold nanoclusters, nanodiamonds, synthetic polymers, quantum dots, green fluorescent protein, and bimaterial microcantilevers. We also discuss a critique of these thermometric methods and provide some responses to this critique.

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